Stuck

Stuck

Cracks in the pavement
are pages in your diary,
detailing the days
of wasted waiting.

The day rivers rebelled,
your head full of warmer climes,
despite the iced hair
licking your face.

The face charming all.
You did not throw bricks,
granting the entrance
to the Malley’s home.

Moving to the big city,
they took your best friend.
Promises to write
and insincere hopes.

The wish against fact.
Futile hopes never dying.
The map says: ‘you are here’.
It is lying.

by Kimberly Jamison

The West Pier

The West Pier
is a wooden spider.
Its body is the
arsonist’s artistry.
The wind blows through
the gaping rooftop spine
but the concert hall hollow bones
stay silenced.
Its legs are splayed
determined to remain
dipping its cast-iron toes
into the murky sea
pointing to  the place
someone swam
to light the flame
that turned a postcard picture
into this
burnt out ruin.

by Kimberly Jamison

Ode to the quiet rebel

Oh you, shy you
Wearing red when everyone else wears blue
writing stories underneath the desk during maths class
pockets full of poems
and head full of questions 
Stay true, quiet rebel, stay true 

Injecting socialist quips into the capitalist force 
hoping for the butterfly effect 
leading by example 
not do as I say
Stay true, quiet rebel, stay true

Ink stained hands balled into fists
when the digital box shows more injustice 
feeling like an outsider
a left among the right
Stay true, quiet rebel, stay true

Keep being you with that quiet strength
that gives the rest of us resolve 
you don’t have to sing or shout.
Don’t worry, I hear your voice 
So stay true, quiet rebel, stay true 
By Kimberly Jamison 

For my favourite quiet rebels : Andrea, Lisa and Lizzie

Constructive destruction

trek down through crisp leaves, red fruit
to the pit of unspoken words
stone circles keeping safe from the fury within
duck under the flames
in and out through the dragon’s whisps 
embers snowing upon shoulders
branches above catching light
heat drawing tears from eyes
playing catch with the opaque smoke
giving the wooden offerings
finally rising up above are
the ghosts of what could have been

By Kimberly Jamison